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Archive for procrastinating

5 Myths about Being Organized

Myth 1 Organization is a born talent

Organization is a skill. If you have the right resources or support it is really quite easy. Some tasks at home can be simplified so they are not so over whelming and time consuming.  Here is one small example about meal planning.

  1. Pick your menu for the week
  2. From the menu make your shopping list
  3. Now you don’t need to decide what to make each morning or evening and you can take out of the freezer the items you need for later in the day.
  4. After you have done this for a number of weeks or months you can start recycling your plan.  This makes it even easier as you just pull up an already completed menu plan.

    Plan a menu then build your grocery shopping list.

    Plan a menu then build your grocery shopping list.

Myth 2 – Organized space is neat, tidy, minimal and boring.

Organized spaces should reflect your personality and lifestyle. If you can’t enjoy the space then you won’t take care of it.

Myth 3 –Getting organized is an overwhelming, hopeless chore

No matter what you’re organizing, no matter how daunting the task or how huge the backlog, getting organized boils down to developing a predictable process which you can reproduce. You follow your process and organize the current things you are using and then each time you’re organizing, work for a little time on the backlog.

Develop processes that work for you, can you can stay organized.

Develop processes that work for you, so you can stay organized.

Myth 4 -It’s impossible to stay organized

Organizing is sustainable, if your system is built around the way you think and designed to grow and adapt with you.  Here are some tips:

  1. If it only takes 30 seconds , do it right away if not add it to your to do list
  2. Most unorganized people don’t notice things are in the “wrong place.” Look and do a mental check to see if everything has been returned to its assigned space.
  3. Use spare minutes wisely.  Have a list of small tasks that can be completed quickly when you are waiting for meeting, appointments, trains, planes, children, elderly parents.
  4. Use your lists to record: things to do , to call, to e-mail and errands .  Check the list don’t just write it down.

Myth 5 Organizing is a non-productive use of your time.

You can’t afford to not be organized. A national survey conducted by Professional Organizers in Canada in 2010, indicates 91% of disorganized Canadians feel that disorganization negatively impacts their lives – with a large focus on feelings of stress, frustration and even failure. According to a study by a Boston marketing firm, the average American loses 55 minutes a day, roughly 12 weeks a year, looking for things they know they own but can’t find.  Newsweek, June 7, 2004.”

Leave me a comment about what is stopping you from becoming organized.

Make a Decision and Learn from Your Mistakes

Harold Taylor is a time management specialist.  This article appears in his June 2015 Taylor Time newsletter. Contact him to get on his mailing list and receive other great information on organizing time and space. Harold Taylor Time Consultants Inc  | info@taylorintime.com

Slow decision-making wastes time, as do spur-of-the moment decisions, which usually result in costly and time-The Thinkerconsuming mistakes. But the worst thing you can do is to procrastinate on decision-making. Napoleon Hill, author of Think and Grow Rich, once conducted a survey of successful people and found all of them were decisive. Don’t be afraid of being wrong. We learn from our mistakes; but if we do nothing, we neither accomplish anything nor learn anything.

Delay until you have enough information, but don’t wait until you have all the information. If you have all the information, the course of action becomes a foregone conclusion: no real decision is necessary. Have the courage to make decisions with only 70% to 80% of the facts. When you have mulled over the facts and considered, the alternatives, sleep on it. Decisions are usually better after a good night’s sleep.

Spend time in proportion to the importance of the decision. For instance, don’t waste a lot of time discussing the menu for the staff Christmas party. The decision to close down an operation or expand the product line warrants a greater expenditure of that costly commodity called time. Make minor decisions quickly. If the consequence of the decision is not important, it is not worth much of your valuable time.

If the decision is yours alone to make, and you seem to get bogged down in the process, and get frustrated by your lack of progress, it’s frequently faster in the long run to leave the problem for a short period of time. Work on some unrelated jobs for a few hours or even a few days and then tackle the problem anew. The change in pace will revitalize your thinking. But delay it only once or you will be tempted to procrastinate.

Always make short-term decisions with long-term objectives in mind. Don’t make a band aid decision that solves the immediate problem, but results in time-consuming problems further down the road.

And above all, don’t waste time on past decisions. Instead of saying “I if only I had done such and such,” say instead, “Next time I will ..”

photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/53326337@N00/4473565014″>Well, that’s perplexing…</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/”>(license)</a>

 

Ultimate Blogging Challenge – Success or Failure

Is daily blogging for you?

It starts again on July 1, 2015

You may remember that in April I had joined the Ultimate Blogging Challenge where you blog everyday for a month.  I started out great for the first 10 days feeling like I had some fun content.  The suggestions they sent as part of the resources where somewhat helpful.  I had forgot about blogging about books.  They suggested blogging about fun days and so I talked about the world figure skating chapionships.  However as time went on my business got very busy and I felt like I didn’t have interesting content so I blogged less.  I am glad I tried this experiment because:

1. It is not for me, once a week is a good time frame for me.  I can keep up with the schedule and I have content I am proud to share

2. I discovered that my new blog had not been set up the way  I thought and articles were not being shared with my social media sites.  Since I was blogging regularly I notice the change and got it corrected.

3.I received 30 different ideas for blogging.  Most were personal rather than business topics but they are excellent for brainstorming new ideas and new approaches to blogging.

So overall  I think the experiment was valuable.  Give it a try, it starts again on July 1, 2015 and let me know how it went for you.

Do I Have a Disease or a M.E.S.S.?

When your life becomes disorganized it is usually caused by one of four reasons.  If you are feeling overwhelmed,  try looking at your M.E.S.S. this way.

wooden shelves mounted on wall

Shelves make storing items easier

M – Mechanical

Clutter can be caused because you don’t have the right type of storage. It is a mechanical problem.

  •  A drawer maybe broken,
  • There aren’t any shelves to put things on
  • There aren’t any closets
  • Your containers are too small or too big or you don’t have any

E. Emotional

  • Some people are very sentimental and find it difficult to let go of things.  Try to remember that it is the relationship that you have with the person that is important not the item they gave you.
  • Depression makes it hard to have enough energy to make decisions and organize your items
  • Anxiety can clutter your mind so you find it difficult to make decisions
  • OCD

S. Situational

people with boxes on their head

Packing and unpacking can cause disorganization, temporarily

There are things that happen in your life that can put you into a state of chaos temporarily

  • Having a baby
  • Moving
  • Divorce
  • Seasonal Celebrations – Halloween, Christmas. Passover,
  • The end of school or the beginning of a year
  • Renovations

S. Systems

app

Have a system for meal planning and grocery shopping

If you have systems in place for getting things done than the work becomes easier because you don’t have to think about how to do it, who will do it, when it will get done. Develop systems for

  • laundry
  • meal planning and grocery shopping
  • collecting the garbage and getting to the curb or dumpster
  • gift giving
  • feeding the pets
  • doing homework

You probably don’t have a disease that is causing you to be disorganized just a mechanical, emotional, situational or systematic problem that is contributing to your temporary disorganization .  Determine which is the main cause of your disorganization and your problems can be solved so you have a great S.P.A.C.E.

 

 

 

 

Work Life Balance Tip

Life consists of Family Career Health and Friends

Work Life Balance

1. The best way to gain/have/maintain work life balance is to schedule everything.  It will seem daunting at first because you need to schedule exercise , work ,your children’s activities, beauty appointments, laundry, grocery, shopping, time off, cleaning, yard work, sports, entertainment etc.  Once you have completed this activity you have a better understanding of what your day is like, how your week will function and what is going on in the month.

 

2. In order to be successful you must be ridge with yourself and stick to your schedule.  If you allow yourself to give up “life ” time for work you will probably never get it back.  Some people say they can’t be creative if they are scheduled.  Think closely about that argument. Perhaps you don’t know how to schedule your time or maybe you don’t want to have enough time to get everything done .  Remember scheduling allows you to be creative within each block of time and activity.

3. Work life balance is important because it allows you to be functioning at your best.   Your stress is reduced if you can accomplish the things that are important to you, have the relationships you want, and are accountable to those that are depending on you. Happiness and contentment can be yours for the taking.

Organizing Your Mind

In Harold Taylor’s newsletter www.taylorintime.com , May 2014,  he talked about Organizing your Mind to create the life you want.

By Harold Taylor

It’s more important to organize your mind than your desk or house. You can always walk away from your desk or house; but you can never walk away from your mind. We must first accept the fact that time is not life, as many of us in the past may have suggested; it is merely the medium through which life passes. And life, as you experience it, is not something that happens to you, but something that happens because of you. You create the life you will experience – good, bad or indifferent – by what you believe, how you think, and what you do.

To create the life that you want, you must first organize your mind. And you do this by clearing it of all the worldly clutter that keeps it preoccupied and constantly distracted. One way of doing this is to engage in a 15 or 20-minute mind-clearing session each morning after you get up and are fully dressed. Don’t do it while you are still in bed and half asleep. This is too important. It will determine how the rest of the day goes. And life takes place in a series of days.

Complete your morning ritual of breakfast, getting the kids off to school, putting out the garbage or whatever your morning routine entails. Then sit comfortably in your favourite chair, and without trying to rid your mind of the random thoughts that will invariably invade it, do the following six things in succession.

  1.  Relax, close your eyes, breathe deeply, and just be aware of the miracle that is you.
  2. Give thanks for all that you have and have had in the past. Don’t rack your brain trying to think of everything – just those that come to mind quickly.
  3. Forgive anyone who has hurt or offended you.
  4. Offer up ten-second prayers, blessings or good wishes for at least three other people each day.
  5. Think positive thoughts about all your future plans, opportunities and endeavors,
  6. Decide and confirm how you will spend the next hour of your life. This may already be scheduled in your planner or you may choose something different.

The reason for doing these six things will be explained in the next article in this series on holistic time management. But the reason will probably become clear to you as you progress through each day.

Whether you call this session meditation, mindfulness, or “being in the now” is immaterial. What is important is that you continue to do it each day, modifying it as you go along, until it becomes your unique morning routine. And how you spend the next hour of each day will eventually create the life that you will lead.

Understanding Sleep Cycles and Time Management can improve your Productivity

Some people say they don’t need very much sleep.  Recently a super sleep gene was found.  Only about 5% of people have it.  It allows their body to cycle through the REM and non REM sleep cycles more quickly so the person feels more rested in a shorter amount of time. Unfortunately about 30% of people report only needing 4 hours of sleep a night.  So about 25% of those people would benefit from more sleep. Harold Taylor is a time management expert.  He publishes a newsletter, Taylor Time Newsletter.  The August edition has a great article on sleep and time management.

BY Harold Taylor Work Smarter is more about Timing then Technology

When we sleep, we do so in approximately 90-minute cycles throughout the night, each cycle consisting of five stages – four stages of non-REM sleep (about 75% to 80% of our sleep time) and one stage of REM sleep (about 20% to 25% of our sleep time.)

The first REM stage begins about 90 minutes into our sleep and then the cycle begins again about every 90 minutes until we wake up.

What most people don’t realize is that these 90-minute “sleep cycles” run through the entire day. We obviously don’t sleep during the day if we have slept sufficiently during the night, but the cycles become waves of high and low energy and are referred to as ultradian rhythms.  Our internal clocks are critical to our personal performance as well as our health and well-being. Our body has many internal “clocks,” each operating independently but in constant communication with one another.

In a few of my books and articles and all of my seminars, I talk about scheduling projects in 90 minute segments. (See “The 90-minute Rule of Scheduling” in chapter 6 of my eBook, Time to be Productive CLICK HERE for a free copy)

I have always known that I was more productive working in sixty or ninety-minute chunks of time, and I suggested all kinds of reasons for it – such as it was the maximum amount of time I could work without having to be interrupted or even interrupting myself. But I never knew until recently that ultradian waves of high and low alertness had actually been identified. One study of young violinists back in 1993 revealed that the best violinists all practiced the same way – in the morning in three segments of no more than 90 minutes with a break between each segment. The same thing was noticed among other musicians as well as athletes, chess players and writers.

I recommend that people find their high energy time in the morning and start working on their top priority items for about 90 minutes. Then take a break of about 15 or 20 minutes before starting the next task. Following the second 90-minute work session there should be a break of at least an hour before resuming. (This could be lunch and a brief walk.) It will take time to get into the right pattern. You have to listen to your body to determine the best start time and the actual duration of your high-alertness cycle.

You don’t necessarily have to take a coffee break, go for a walk or do stretches during your breaks as long as you switch to a different type of task. There are three basic types of activity – mental, physical and emotional. If you have been working on a mental task requiring intense concentration such as writing a business proposal, a switch to cleaning your work area, filing or checking messages on Twitter or Facebook for twenty minutes might be just as relaxing to the mind as a twenty minute chat at the coffee centre.

The problem is that people have been fighting their natural body rhythms by feeding it coffee and other stimulants, and therefore developing inefficient working habits. They have likewise short-circuited their natural sleep cycles with late nights, artificial lighting and stimulating electronics.

Contact www.taylorintime.com to subscribe to his newsletter

 

How to Avoid being a Procrastinator

Why don’t I want to do it now?

Is it boring?

  • Do it anyway and consider the consequence if you don’t do it.

    Procrastination PDF

    How can you stop procrastinating?

Overwhelming?

  • Break it into smaller parts and do one or several parts at a time

Do I only have small blocks of time available but want to do everything from start to finish?

  • Change your mindset and make it a positive idea.  Small blocks of time mean you only need to do a small amount of work

Am I tired?

  • Be aware of your circadian rhythms.  Each of us peaks at different hours of the day.  Before and after lunch is usually a good time to catch up on mundane activities

Do I fear failing or that it won’t turn out perfectly?

  • Fear on losing things,
  • forgetting things
  • not finishing things or
  • doing the wrong thing can generate a lack of action which can affect your self-esteem.

 

How to be Successful

If you are easily distracted keep only one project on your desk at a time.

Give yourself a time span to complete a project and don’t let your mind wonder from the task

Try setting small goals and giving your self rewards

Think of how you will feel when the task is completed, pride, relief, satisfaction

 

There are more great ideas in a book titled  “Don’t Agonize Organize Your Office”By Diane A Hatcher

Residential Organizing Services for the Region of Niagara, Hamilton, Halton-Peel and Surrounding Area