Author Archive for Julie Stobbe – Page 3

Back to school – making homework easy

Helping your child to be successful with their homework is about planning.  Plan a time when your child can concentrate and an adult is available to lend support to the task.  Some children will be able to do homework right after they finish school other children will need time to do some physical activity  before they can concentrate and yet other children will need to eat first.

Mother and child and after school homework

Have a quiet area near an adult . Children may need support from an adult at times to be successful

 

You will need a spot that has limited distractions, minimize stimulation from video screens and phones and reduce loud conversations with other family members in the homework area.

Large projects take more than one night to complete.  Help your child learn how to plan ahead.  Look at the week and weekend and see what time is available to work on the project.  Divide the project into smaller sections that can be completed a little at a time during the week and on the weekend.  At first it takes a lot of discipline from the parent and the child but as the family gets used to planning ahead your child will tell you that they need your help with some homework and the only night you are both home is Wednesday.  It will be great when they take over the time management of homework.

Large projects can be broken down into smaller sections and a little parts can be completed each day.

Teach your child management so they will have enough time to complete large projects.

Each child will be different, some will like quiet spaces and others will like to be around people. Some tasks will need large spaces and others will need hardly any space. Click To Tweet Many families have shared custody of children between parents and some families are always on the move taking children to after school events where children need to do homework while they are waiting for siblings to finish an activity.

have supplies on hand that can be taken with you so your child can complete their homework on the move.

Help your child be able to complete their homework quickly

 

Help your child be prepared so they can complete their homework quickly

Have a portable homework station that can be taken anywhere

Taking into consideration all the variables, homework areas need to be portable.  Children need have a container with all the pens pencils markers erasers ruler stapler tape glue paper calculator etc. they need.  This container can be used in any room in the house allowing for flexibility.  Let your child organize the container since they know what they need.   This container can be put in the car and taken along to activities, babysitters, parent’s homes.  It is important that children have the supplies they need and learn to take care of them so they can get their work done.  If you choose to have one room or area for homework make sure to consult your child about what it should look like so they want to work in that area.

Share your tip for making homework and enjoyable experience.

Join my Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

6 Tips about laundry and your student- Bring it home or do it at school?

Success in doing laundry starts with packing the right clothes.When packing for college or university stay away from white clothes, they will turn grey and red clothes that will turn everything pink.  Leave them at home.Discuss who is responsible for doing laundry before your student leaves for university. Click To Tweet

1. Practice

 If your student has not done laundry at home use the last month or two before they leave to teach them how to use a washer, sort laundry, empty pockets and use a stain remover .

2. Money

Find out if the washers and dryers need coins or if money is put on a plastic swipe card.  Put some money on the card or send coins to get them started and into the habit of doing laundry.

3. Laundry ” Basket”

Provide a central collection area for their laundry in their room.  It might be on the back of a door or chair, a bin or bag in the closet. It needs to be easily portable so they can move it easily to the Laundromat which may be on another floor.

Collapsible Laundry Basket

Mesh laundry baskets let damp things dry until they are washed

cloth laundry bag

Put a laundry bag on the back of a door.

 

Backpack laundry bags make it easy to get everything to the laudromat.

Backpack laundry bags make it easy to get everything to the laudromat.

Plastic ventilated laundry basket.

A basket can be put in any convenient location and is sitting open easily to throw clothes in.

4. Supplies

Buy liquid laundry detergent because it dissolves quickly and comes in small bottles. It is better to have a supply of small bottles than a large one which is heavy and hard to take to the Laundromat.  Buy fabric sheets for the dryer as the student will probably never be there for the rinse cycle.

5. A place to hang damp clothes

Have a place to hang up clothes – a line, door hooks or a free-standing wire rack in their room for things that are damp or that they don’t want to put in the dryer.

wooden folding clothes drying rack

Use a rack to dry clothes and save money

Folding Clothes Drying Rack

Folding wooden or wire racks can be hidden away when they are not in use under the bed or in the closet.

Plastic over the door hooks

Over the door hooks come in many styles to fit the door and space.

 

over the door hooks are great for hanging up damp clothes

over the door hooks are great for hanging up damp clothes

6. Who does the laundry, parent, student, home or at school?

Decide if you will do their laundry when they come home on weekends. Set the policy early so there are no surprises.

Share your experience about laundry successes and failures.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook – Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Organizing a Student’s move to University or College

Panic maybe starting to set in.  This is the time of year for back to school.  Some of you maybe moving a student to a school close to home, some may have a long drive to the new school and others may have to fly.  Whether you may be able to make multiple trips to your student’s school or if you have one chance to get it right,  Anne Wynter’s    How to Cut College Clutter  shares my tips in this lovely blog post about:

  1. Clothes
  2. Documents
  3. Mini Kits
  4. Sentimental Items
Having an over abundance of possessions in your dorm room or apartment can contribute to poor time management and a constant feeling of being overwhelmed, Click To Tweet

Make your move a successful, low stress enjoyable event.

dorm room organizing

How much should I take?

 

Join my  Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 Click here to  learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

 

Learning about the overwhelm of stuff – hoarding disorder

Here is a great article about living with the overwhelming need for stuff.  If you have a hoarding disorder or live with  someone who has a hoarding disorder  this information may help you to better understand the situation.

Hoarding living with the overwhelm of stuff.

 

Looking for some more information on hoarding disorder?  Go to the Institute of Challenging Disorganization website. Share your stories with us. 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook  Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space 

Click hear to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

 

 

Lack of abundance

 

Are you stuck in a mindset of “lack”?

Do you sometimes feel that you will never get ahead.  That life is holding you back.  I feel that way some days when I am working in my  business.   There can be a number of stumbling blocks to becoming successful.  Some we may not have any control over.  One of the biggest stumbling blocks can be our own attitude.  This short video gives you an insight into how to examine your attitude and move from focusing on what you don’t have (lack) and focusing on what you do have (abundance).

Click here to learn about an attitude of abundance. 

How do you overcome those feelings that you can’t achieve  something that you want to accomplish? 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 Twitter Facebook  Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space 

Click here to learn  more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

3 Alternative ways to get rid of your clutter

My guest blogger is Haley Kieser from Zog Digital helping us to reduce our clutter in environmental friendly ways.

The moment you realize you’ve accumulated way too much clutter and then need to take action, is common. It happens.

It might be the cheap coffee table you bought (it was too good of a deal to pass up) or the endless number of t-shirts you’ll never wear. Or maybe you’re moving and need to get rid of old kitchen appliances and mattresses. No matter what your clutter consists of, it’s important to know how to get rid of it.Let's keep our clutter out of the landfill and recycle it in environmental friendly ways. Click To Tweet

Why? Let’s look at Hamilton but it could be anywhere.

To keep Hamilton beautiful, of course! If you live near or close to Hamilton, these are the best alternative ways to get rid of your waste. (Other than the local trash collection.)

Let’s get started.

1. Donating your clutter in Hamilton

Donate clothing in good repair to thrift stores and older items can go to textile recycling. Let’s keep it out of the landfill

Is there any better feeling than giving back to the community?

Anytime you purge your closet, or your kids outgrow their clothing, bag up what needs to go and bring it to a thrift store.

But don’t stop at clothing!

Thrift stores collect all sorts of personal items. Such as books, toys, dishes, jewelry, and much more.

Some organizations like Habitat for Humanity will even collect construction and building materials.

Remember, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. If you’re unsure about what you can donate, give them a call.

Another great way to donate is the old-school hand-me-down method. Shoot a message to family and friends to see if they could use your old coffee table or winter coat.

Need more direction? Use this thrift store directory.

2. Host a garage sale or sell online

If you enjoy meeting people and bartering then a garage sale is for you.

If your clutter still holds value, why not cash in on it? Host a garage sale or sell your items online.

One of the best times to have a garage sale is in the summer. Before you begin setting up, always check the weather.

Tip: Set a fair price on your goods. Don’t let the thought of making money distract you of your main goal – getting rid of your clutter.

Get cash before the event in case the buyer needs change. Additionally, if you have time, promote your garage sale on social media up until the event.

If you have leftover inventory list everything on Craigslist. If time doesn’t permit, donate the rest.

Hosting a garage sale is a great way to make some cash and can even be fun. Get the family involved, play some tunes, and hangout with each other for the day!

3. Hire someone to do it for you

For items that aren’t as easy to donate or even throw out, like an old over or cabinetry, hiring a service to pick it up may be the best route.

A full-service junk removal company will come to your home or business and do all the work for you. All you have to do is tell them what to get rid of.

Before choosing a company, make sure they have an environmental program in place, where they donate or recycle as much as possible.

If you’re constrained by time or have too much clutter to deal with, this will let you rest easy knowing you disposed of your clutter responsibly.

Note: You will have to pay for a service like this. Yet, they’re not very expensive. Especially if you have a handful of heavy items, it’s worth the money.

Decluttering your home or business can be a huge task and should be applauded. The next step is to take care of that clutter responsibly.

Use the motivation to become organized to keep Hamilton beautiful!

Need help identifying what’s clutter and what isn’t? Let us help you.

Before you go, here are some additional resources:

Use these links as inspiration to  find out if your community has similar resources.

Share your  best tip for reducing and recycling your clutter inthe comment box.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 Twitter Facebook – Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space 

CLick here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Organize your desk in 5 minutes a day

Decluttering your desk at home and at the office is not just about having a space that looks good.  Desktop chaos can take a toll on your productivity — and even lead to making unhealthy choices. Four in 10 workers say that having a tidy, organized space helps them behave more productively. Click To Tweet Another study published in the journal Psychological Science found that those who spent their time in an orderly office made healthier eating choices.

This week my guest blogger is Jessica Pyykkonen of Ghergich & Co. She has teamed up with Quill to create an infographic on decluttering and organizing your desk. It shows  research on messy workplaces and benefits of a clean, clutter-free desk. Then they break down several strategies to keep your desk clean and organized. For instance, you can take advantage of vertical space with cork-boards, shelves, and pegboards to help keep your desk clear.

Enjoy these office organizing tips and become more productive, healthier and happier.

 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life of your dreams. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook – Join my Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Grid It – A Great Organizing Gadget

I enjoy travelling and have travelled to Europe, the East, Australia, throughout Canada, the United States and the Caribbean.

I am going to give 2 tips for travelling with an organized purse.  (It works for backpacks and briefcases too)
  1. Buy a purse that has a light lining.  When the inside of the purse is dark it is very hard to find anything, organized or not.  A lot of items are black or dark in colour, make-up, pens, phones, keys, wallets etc.
  2. Try purchasing a gadget called Grid It.  It comes in many sizes but the small one fits lovely inside a purse and keeps all your small items that you need for flying and travelling neat and tidy.  It is wonderful for holding a pen, earbuds, adapters, candy, phone, keys.  You pull it out of your purse everything is contained on the Grid it and you pull out the items you need and put it back in your purse.  No digging around in the corners to find the thing you want.

How do you keep all your small items easy to find and use? Share your tips in the comments.

Grid It

Use it to organize your electronic devises when you are travelling

 

Grid It

Great for organizing items in your purse when you are travelling

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 Twitter    Facebook    Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click her if you want to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Organizing your medication for your health and safety – medicine cabinet 101

Medicine Cabinet 101

How to Store Pharmaceuticals

My guest blogger is Laura Schwecherl who is writing for  Health Perch a digital magazine from the USA.  Many of the tips in this article apply no matter where you live. BY

Cholesterol-lowering pills and allergy eye drops may reside on the bed stand. The medicine cabinet probably holds a cluster of medications (antacids, asthma inhalers, antibiotics) and a few stray ibuprofen may even float around the bottom of your handbag. More than one third of American adults regularly use over-the-counter medications and 65 percent of all adults in the U.S. (roughly 131 million people) use prescription drugs. But not all of us know how to store and dispose of medication safely.

We’ve got your medicine cabinet covered with a comprehensive guide on storing and disposing prescription and OTC drugs. Read on to learn how to stay out of harm’s way.

The Best Way to Store Your Meds

Store it right: How and where to keep your medications

Up to 50 percent of chronic disease patients (for instance people with arthritis, asthma, cancer, COPD, diabetes) fail to follow directions and take their medicine as prescribed. A simple misstep can lead to higher health risks and medical bills.

One way to avoid this problem is to stay organized. While some households store meds in a number of locations, it’s easier to keep track when they’re all in one place. Try to make medicine taking a part of your daily routine (whether it’s right after breakfast, before dinner, or before bed—whatever your doctor suggests based on the requirements of each medication) and stick to a schedule. Pill organizers are another great way to prevent confusion if you or a family member takes multiple pills a day. It’s also a great idea to take an inventory of your prescriptions at least once every six months.

When choosing a place to keep prescriptions, seek a spot that stays cool and dry, such as a kitchen drawer away from appliances (heat and moisturecan damage pills). For this reason, a medicine cabinet in the bathroom may not live up to its name, unless the bathroom is well ventilated with fans or windows.

Travel poses its own obstacles. If you’re traveling in the car, don’t keep medicine in the glove compartment, which can get very hot. If you’re jet setting, pack prescriptions in a carry-on bag in case your luggage is lost or temporarily delayed. Pack medicine in the original bottle and take a copy of your prescription to avoid any trouble with security.

The Best Way to Dispose of Meds

How to properly dispose of medications

This isn’t a simple toss in the trash situation. Discarding pills is a matter of safety: Many medicines are unsafe if taken by the wrong person. Medications that have passed the expiration date can also be dangerous.

The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) provides specific guidelines to dispose prescriptions safely.

Take old, unused, or expired prescriptions out of the bottle and throw them away. It’s best to mix them with icky garbage such as coffee grounds, cat litter, or compost. This helps prevent others from getting into those pills. (Every year, more than 60,000 kids go to the emergency room because they took medicine that wasn’t theirs.)

Experts have mixed feelings about flushing prescriptions down the toilet. Some question it due to trace amounts of drug residues found in surface water. Groups including the FDA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have closely monitored this issue and so far have not reported any apparent safety or environmental issues.

The simple rule of thumb? Only flush medications if the label or your doctor says it’s safe. (Here’s a list of meds that can take a trip down the toilet.)

To ensure safety on all fronts, head to a designated drop off site. There are also many community take-back programs for old medicines. Head to theDEA website to see what’s available near you.

Check with your local pharmacy.  If you are a customer, they will take your expired medication and get rid of it for you.

Safety First!

Rx safety tips for effective prescription use

Popping pills isn’t a one-and-done endeavor. There are some easy guidelines to make sure you take prescriptions the intended way. Additionally, you can pledge to store medications safely and learn more about pharmaceutical safety at Up and Away.

So without further adieu, here are 14 tips to make sure you store and take medications safely.

Always ask. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist. They’re the experts when it comes to the proper way to take, store, and get rid of them.

Check the expiration date. Always check the expiration date on the bottle. Expired medicines may not only be ineffective, they could be harmful too.

Look for warning signs. Check for pills that look discolored or dried out. If anything looks funky, take a picture and call your doctor to make sure it’s still safe to consume.

Never reuse and recycle. Still have that prescription cough medicine that expired in 2012? Always discard leftover medicine even if you think you may use it again. It’s always best to have a doctor prescribe new medicine despite any similar symptoms.

Keep it in the same container. The bottle’s tint helps protect pills from light and lists important information including the name of the prescription, when to take it, and your pharmacy’s number for when it’s time for a refill.

Don’t mix meds. Many pills look similar, and it’s easier than one might think to accidentally pop the wrong one.

Remove the cotton. Some pill bottles come with cotton inside to help protect pills that are shipped from online pharmacies. Remove the cotton as soon as you open the bottle. The cotton attracts moisture, which could decrease the medication’s strength.

Separate from your spouse. Keep your medicines separate from your spouse or other family members to lower the chances of mixing.

Open in a safety zone. Open meds on a countertop so you can rest the bottle on a flat surface. There’s always a chance of a pill slipping out of the bottle, and you don’t want to lose it on the floor or down a drain.

Keep the lights on. Don’t take pills in the dark or in bad lighting. Good light helps ensure you take the right pill and correct dose.

Lock ‘em out. It’s crucial to lock your prescriptions in a drawer if you have small kids.

Close it tight. Use that arm strength to close the lid tight. This also helps childproof the bottles.

Be prepared in case of an emergency. Call your poison control center immediately if you think a child may have taken one of your prescriptions. Save the number in your phone so you can dial right away.

Conclusion

By now, you should be an expert on pill safety—from storage and use to proper disposal. Stick to these guidelines (and some common sense) and you’ll be on the fast track to health.

Share how you organize your medications in the comments.  My 91 year old dad made an excel spreadsheet to track the timing of his eye drops after he had cataract surgery.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 Twitter  Facebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space 

Click here if you want to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer? 

 

Organizing for a road trip

This advise appeared in the P.O.S.T Professional Organizing Strategies and Tips newsletter. To learn about Professional Organizers in Canada  click this linkhttp://www.organizersincanada.com/.  

There’s something about summer, the lure of the open road and the promise of a change of scenery that makes us want to load up the car and just go some place. If there’s one time you really want to be organized, it’s when you’re travelling. Travelling requires more organization than we may possess in our daily lives, so cut the stress by following an organizing checklist for inside the car.

Planning & Prepping

  • Make sure your car is good condition –  oil checked, tires inspected and filled – test the air conditioning and wiper blades.
  • Driver’s licence, passports, insurance card, ownership and registration, and contact numbers for roadside assistance should be readily accessible. Make spare copies and leave with a travel companion.
  • Spare tire and jack – are in good shape and are easy to access. An emergency car tool kit should include an orange flag or pylon that you can use to signal for help if needed. Learn how to change a flat tire.
  • Spare set of keys – in case they get locked inside the car or drop out of your pocket. (Even if you have to call a locksmith to open the car, you’ll be able to drive when it’s unlocked.)
  • Plastic grocery bags for garbage – always!

    Back seat organizer

    Keep your backseat organized with a portable blue bin

  • These blue bins fit between two seats and can hold a lot of gear. Each young member of the family can have their own bin for a blanket, sweatshirt, hat, sunglasses, spare shoes. They can access anything that they need on their own and have a place to wrangle their souvenirs.
  • A file box with a labelled folder for each section of the road trip.

Maps

  • A traditional map or print custom maps for your journey at GoogleMaps or MapQuest Route Planner. CAA or AAA will also provide route maps.
  • (GPS) A Global Positioning System – some travelers say they wouldn’t leave home without one!
  • APPS are available on smartphones to find everything from restaurants, hotels, parks, other points of interest as well as weather reports and plenty of games, quizzes and puzzles for young ones.
  • Book the hotel ahead so you don’t have to find a place at the end of the day. Find hotels with generous cancellation policies.

In-Car Diversions

  • Music –  A playlist or CD collection if you’re travelling through an area where radio signals might be sketchy.
  • Audio Books, DVDs and a laptop are great to have because it means you don’t need to spend time uploading content to your phone or ipad before the trip when you may be busy.  Check out your local library.
  • Spare batteries, charging cables and electricity power converter for electronics.
  • Healthy Snacks: fruit (apples can keep well for a long time), pretzels, granola bars, crackers and nuts, along with a few fun treats. A trip to the grocery store along the way can help you save money too, because the costs of dining out can add up.
  • Beverages: A soft-sided cooler packed with water bottles and low-sugar soft drinks.

Toiletries within easy reach

  • Tissues, paper towels, cleaning wipes, hand sanitizer and a roll of toilet paper, in case the rest stop isn’t well-stocked.
  • Prescription medicines as well as basics like pain relievers, antacids and remedies for motion sickness.
  • Sunglasses, sunscreen and insect repellent.
  • A first aid kit with antiseptic and band-aids for minor cuts, cortisone cream for insect bites, and bandages.

Clothing & Comfort

  • Wear comfortable clothing – no items which restrict or bind.
  • Wear shoes that are easy to take on and off. Always have a pair of closed toe shoes available.
  • A sweater or jacket over a T-shirt for instant respectability in public areas.
  • A small blanket if you disagree on the temperature setting within the car.
  • A pillow from home for an unfamiliar hotel bed.

Finally

  • Think twice before posting about your trip on social media if your house is currently empty!!

What is your best travelling tips? Share it with us in the comments.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 Twitter     Facebook   Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

 Click here if you Want to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

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