Author Archive for Julie Stobbe

5 tips to help you organize your email

Reading time: 10 minutes

In 2020 there were 306 billion emails sent and received each day worldwide. Experts generally agree that a person sends and receives 121 business emails each day. The best time to send an email is between 10-11 am.  The average professional spends 28% of the workday reading and answering email, according to a McKinsey analysis. For the average full-time worker in America, that amounts to a staggering 2.6 hours spent per day. Jan. 22, 2019

It is no wonder that you are so distracted by e-mail that you can’t get anything done? Here are 5 tips to help you manage your email communications.

1.  Turn off the audio reminder of e-mail arriving in your inbox so you won’t be distracted from the task you are trying to complete.

2. Set aside two or three specific times of the day to check your e-mail and respond to quick items with a ‘yes’ or ‘no’.  Schedule, in your agenda, longer e-mails to be answered when you have more time.

3.  Cut down on those 121 emails by reducing the number of lists and newsletters you subscribe to.  They are just like magazines that lie around waiting to be read and creating a feeling of stress in you.

4.  Keep your inbox as empty as possible by creating folders to store receipts, orders, invitations, information etc.  Search functions do work well for finding old emails, leaving them all in your inbox means you spend time re-reading emails.

5.  Don’t respond to e-mails from companies and people you don’t know.  Don’t respond to any e-mail asking for or giving you money.

The average professional spends 2.6 hours each day on approximately 120 emails. Click To Tweet

Share your best tip that helps you use email productively?

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports you to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Online courses are available to help instruct, coach and support your organizing projects. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

Click here to learn more about her online course Create an Organized Home.

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Share this:

Manage Technology Before it Manages You

Reading Time – 5 minute 

In 2020 technology become a communication lifeline.  It was used for education, business, family communications, school and social events.  It became the most important method of communication and entertainment.  Zoom took over life.  Will this be a difficult habit to change? Do you want to reduce your reliance on technology?  Did technology get you the results you wanted for your life? The ideas and thoughts in this 2014 article by Harold Taylor still hold true for 2021.  How are you going to manage your technology going forward?

 

Who manges what

By Harold Taylor

Harold Taylor is a time management expert.  He has published over 17 books and presented over 2000 seminars.

An online poll of over 1000 Canadian adults released last Saturday by Angus Reid/Vision Critical (Toronto Star, January 26, 2013) revealed that 90% of the respondents believed their smartphones made their lives more convenient. So convenient, evidently, that 30% of them went online before getting out of bed, 31% at the dinner table, 29% in the washroom and 42% before falling asleep at night,

Smartphones may be smart, but they lack intelligence. Why are we so willing to be at the beck and call of an idiot? The Internet leads anywhere, which for the undisciplined means nowhere. Why browse away the hours? Email, computer games and social media are endless, but our time is not. Why do we behave as though we will live forever?

Smartphones maybe smart, but lack intelligence. Harold Taylor Click To Tweet

Research shows that the Internet and digital technology can have a negative impact on our ability to learn, focus, pay attention, memorize and relate to others on a personal basis. It also gobbles up our time, encourages busyness and multitasking and stifles creativity.

The futures of our business, personal lives, and our nations do not depend on the development of technology, but on our ability to manage the technology we develop.

Technology is important, it can’t be avoided, you’re reading this blog, lol.

Comment on how will you change your use of technology? 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports you to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Online courses are available to help instruct, coach and support your organizing projects. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

Click here to learn more about her online course Create an Organized Home.

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Share this:

Have you applied the 80/20 rule to your life?

The 80/20 rule can be applied in many situations and states that 80% of the results come from 20% of the effort.  It is also known as the Pareto Principle. The principle has been named after Vilfredo Pareto—an Italian economist—who, in 1895, noticed that about 80% of Italy’s land belonged to 20% of the country’s population.  Maciej Duszyński states in his article Pareto Principle & the 80/20 Rule, “Pareto’s principle is more of an observation than a full-fledged scientific theory. It is commonly noticeable in a variety of contexts—but it’s not applicable to each and every scenario. Plus, the numbers 80 and 20 should not be added up to 100. The fact it’s called the 80/20 rule is a simply a catchy, historical catchphrase.” As an organizer the 80/20 helps people to easily, subjectively analyze what they use the most, how they spend their time and how to manage their projects.

Possessions

Many times Professional Organizers will talk to clients about the 80/20 rule.  I will say, you use 20% of your stuff, 80% of the time.  This means most of your stuff (80%)  is not used very often.  Think about your clothing.  Do you have some outfits you wear a lot?  You love how they look, feel and you get a lot of compliments. If you apply the 80/20 rule you can let go of 80% of your clothing because you don’t wear them very often.  Think about your other possessions.  Do you have DVDs, books, jewelry, tools, toys and dishes filling your closets and cupboards?  Let go of the 80% that you almost never use.  Organize, enjoy and respect the 20% that you use frequently.

Time Management

Once you realize that 80% of your outcomes come from 20% of the time and effort you spend on them, the importance of prioritizing becomes obvious. If you have a To-Do List, prioritize the top 2 items (20%) and complete them first. Although the other items, of less importance, might not be completed the ones you did complete will have a big impact (80%) on your accomplishments.   Don’t neglect the other tasks. Move on to doing them once you clear the big ones. You can delegate the other tasks. The 80/20 rule will help you to use your time efficiently.

Projects

It is important to understand when a project is finished.   The first 20% of the time you spend on a project will get you to 80% finished. Trying to get the final small amount completed perfectly may not be a good use of your time.  When you have 80% of your project perfected should you move on and publish it, institute the changes or present it for discussion?  I have a saying on my bulletin board that says, “good enough” + “published” is 1000 times more valuable than “perfect” + “not quite ready yet”.  I have seen weeks, months and years spent focusing on making the last 20% perfect.  It can be a stumbling block to your success if it allows you to procrastinate and lets you hide behind the fear of accomplishing a new challenge.  The feedback you receive on your project will be more valuable in perfecting your work than you spending more time on it.

Paper

An organizer, Linda Samuels reminded me that the 80/20 rule can help you with your filing.  She says, “Applying the rule to papers is a good one too. We only retrieve 20% of the papers we file. And since most people (other than organizers) dislike filing, it’s a good thing to keep in mind. Perhaps recycling rather than filing is a better option for that other 80%.”  You usually keep more paper than you need and that makes it difficult to find the 20% that is important in our files.   This is true for emails also.

Kevin Kruse states in his article in Forbes, “No matter what your situation, it’s important to remember that there are only so many minutes in an hour, hours in a day, and days in a week. Pareto can help you to see this is a good thing; otherwise, you’d be a slave to a never-ending list of things to do.”

What 20% of your effort gives you 80% of your satisfaction? 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports you to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Online courses are available to help instruct, coach and support your organizing projects. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

Click here to learn more about her online course Create an Organized Home.

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Share this:

Getting organized – should I do it myself?

Do you enjoy watching all the TV shows about people getting their homes and lives organized?  Some of those shows make it look so easy. So you start thinking about doing it yourself.

Car trunk full of bags of things to donate

Do it yourself?

The is the best answer if you are healthy and can lift and move things around your home to other space and out to your vehicle to take away to be donated. If you can schedule time for your project and are motivated to make your home work well for you, set the time up now to begin your project. There will be a lot of decisions to be made about what to keep and what to give away.  If making those types of decisions come quickly and easily you will be successful with organizing your home. You will need a system for sorting, parting with items and organizing things well.  If you have that plan or want to research how to get organized you are ready to start.

Need some instruction and guidance? 

If you enjoy the physical labour of working around your home and creating a space that suits your lifestyle and personality but you’re not sure of the steps try purchasing an online course.  They can give you the guidance you need when your not sure what comes next or how to set up zones in a room.  Once you learn the process you can repeat it until your entire home is organized. It is a cost-effective way to get your entire home organized.   Create an Organized Home is my online course with video instruction, worksheets and checklists providing you with step-by-step instruction.

Need some motivation and accountability?

You may have good intentions about organizing your home.  Getting started and continuing the work is the hard part of the job for you. Make sure to book appointments in your schedule to do some organizing work.  The appointments may be shorter ones every day or longer ones once a week.  Be consistent, working daily or weekly so you will see progress and that will motivate you to keep going.  Find an accountability partner.  That is someone you tell about your project, when you will be working on organizing your home and exactly what you will do that day.  They will contact you to see if you did the work.   Try working virtually with a Professional Organizer.  They can help you with the initial planning, you meet with them to discuss how the project is moving forward and if you are stuck, together you can come up with solutions.  They will keep you motivated and accountable.  Here are the virtual services I offer.

Need some help letting go of things?

Do you find it difficult to decide what to let go of and pass on to other people to use and enjoy? You may be very sentimental and want to keep everything.  Try thinking about keeping only the best of the best instead of everything.  If you have the best quilt, the best teacup, the best photos in one album, the best painting you will still have all the memories and less possession to clean, pack, move or display.  Other people will be able to enjoy using the items.  It is important to remember that not everything that comes into your life is meant to stay forever. Develop some questions you can ask yourself to help you decide if you are going to keep something or let it go. Decide if you need to touch an item one last time to be able to let it go or if holding and touching the item makes you want to keep it. In this second case, you may need a friend to help you.  If you’re having trouble letting go of things from your past and moving forward I have a 9 week one on one coaching program.

 

Need some company?

Do you really dislike working alone?  Do you like having someone to discuss things with?  Ask a friend to help you.  Put on some motivating music and make it fun.  Make sure you know what you want to do so you can tell your friend what to do.  Have a plan. You want to make good use of the time and not let it become a conversation, coffee or consoling time.   Working with a Professional Organizer is a great way to have help with your project.  Two people working at it will get it done twice as fast.

Here are the in-person professional organizing services I offer.POC Gold Leaf Member

Need some help maintaining your organization?

Do you have a beautifully organized home and bit by bit the place starts to become messy again?  There may be 2 reasons.  First, you may need to adapt your plan so it can work better.  Wherever the piles are forming it is a sign that the place you have chosen to store those items is too far away or too hard to access.  Try storing those items in a new place so it is easy to get them out and put them away. The second reason for the mess developing is you need a maintenance schedule.  Each evening take 15 minutes to put things away and get ready for the next day.  Once each week use an hour to make sure your system is working, everyone is putting things away and declutter some items you may not need. As time goes on you may find small tasks and situations occur that you need help developing a solution for.  Sign up for my Laser Coaching Program. They are quick 15-minute appointments to discuss one (at a time) specific organizing dilemma and decide on a solution to implement.

Everyone has different organizing skills. No matter what part of getting organized is a stumbling block for you there are resources to help. Click To Tweet   Let me know in the comments what is the hardest part of getting or staying organized for you.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports your to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Online courses are available to help instruct, coach and support your organizing projects. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

Click here to learn more about her online course Create an Organized Home.

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

 

Share this:

9 Tips for organizing with children in mind

Reading time – 5 minutes

With school out for summer and children around more of the time think about organizing things so they can keep their stuff put away.  Too many times children can only do half of the job because the shelf is too high for them to reach and an adult needs to finish the job.  Organize things so they can do the entire job of putting things away or getting things out.  It will be less frustrating for everyone.

1. Place hooks so children can reach them and as children grow, the placement of their items should change with their higher reach.

Hooks are great for keeping things off the floor

Have hooks at a variety of heights so each child can reach a hook

2. Organizing items for children to use should be kept within their reach.  If a child constantly needs help accessing these items this will cause frustration for both parent and child.  Keep books, toys, dishes, coat hooks, clothes closet bars and towels at age/size-appropriate level.

3. Designate a place for sporting gear, helmets, pads, shoes etc. It may be a shelf or a pegboard with hooks or a mess bag.  These 3 options allow the sporting gear to dry out before the next usage. It is important to air out damp items so they don’t get mouldy.  When the children arrive home they won’t need to ask a parent what to do with their stuff and when an adult asks them to get ready they can easily collect everything they need.  No more piles of gear left on the floor by the door.

4. Establish a routine for water bottles and lunch bags.  Make sure the children know how to empty and recycle items from their lunch bag and where to put the bag for storing or use the next day.  Do water bottles need to be washed every day or refilled?  What is the rule in your household?

5. Wet swimwear needs to be hung up and dried or washed.  Make a place for towels to be hung and bathing suits to be dried.  Teach your children to wring out or roll their bathing suit in their towel before hanging it up.  This will prevent a puddle of water from forming on the floor.  Placing swimwear and towels on a hanger to dry may be easier to reach than putting it on a line.  You may want to set up a portable clothes drier so it is easy for the children to reach.

 

6. Remember to always keep cleaning supplies and medicines out of the reach of children.

7. If children are permitted to use the microwave oven unsupervised, place the unit at a height where children can remove food easily without climbing on counters or standing on chairs.  This will help prevent injuries from hot food spilling on the child or a child falling.

8. Label bins, drawers, and shelves with pictures or words to make tidying up quick and easy.

Labels with pictures and words

Label containers to make clean up easy

9. Establish a bulletin board, magnet board, or a wall covered with magnetic paint as an area to display children’s work.  As new work comes home, remove items from the display area and put them in a box.  When the school year is over, go through the box and decide which pieces to save and put away and which to recycle.

Did I miss anything?  Let me know in the comments.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports you to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Online courses are available to help instruct, coach and support your organizing projects. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

Click here to learn more about her online course Create an Organized Home.

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Share this:

9 ways to organize a vacation in 2021, enjoy them all

Reading Time 10 minutes

2020/21 have been unusual years. You may have been working less and feel like you don’t need a vacation.  Even though you were working less you weren’t on vacation.  You may have been working harder.  A vacation is a time to step away from all the concerns of your job, in an office, in a home office and tasks in your home.  This break from normal routines and responsibilities lets you rejuvenate and have more energy in the future. Shannon Torberg, PsyD, LP says in The Importance of Taking a Vacation,  “A number of studies have shown that taking time away from the job can have physical and psychological health benefits. People who take vacations have lower stress, less risk of heart disease, a better outlook on life, and more motivation to achieve goals. The bottom line is, taking time away from the stresses of work and daily life can improve your health, motivation, relationships, job performance, and perspective and give you the break you need to return to your lives and jobs refreshed and better equipped to handle whatever comes. ”

Now you know why you deserve one here are some styles of vacations to plan in 2021.

A vacation from your computer. 

laptop and 75" monitor screen

Most of your work is on your computer.  Close it and put it away.  Pretending to be on a vacation by looking at your computer less frequently is not a break from work.  Put an autoreply message on your email explaining when you will respond to emails.

A vacation from your normal routines

A woemen wearing white pants and blue shirt holding a blue cleaning cloth and spray bottle

A stay at home vacation might be the perfect solution for you this year.  Take time to plan it. “Research shows the biggest boost in happiness comes from planning the vacation. A person can feel the effects up to eight weeks before the trip!” Don’t miss out on the planning.  Change your normal routines, bedtime, getting up in the morning, meal times, activities.  Stay up later, get up later, have breakfast in bed, eat out, order in, go for walks, swims, rent a bike, sit in your backyard/balcony, read.  Think of all the things you enjoy doing and make a plan for each day of your vacation.   Fill it with things that you love doing,  want to try for the first time and that are not part of your normal routines. Here is an article that has 100 activities for kids.  

A vacation from your town/city

You may not want to stay overnight in hotels.  You can still plan a vacation outside of your city limits.  There are many communities that surround where you live.  Plan day trips to see local sites and visit markets, parks and walking trails.  Trying googling 5 free things to do in ……. to get ideas of activities and sites to see.

A vacation from loneliness

women isting on a chair with her knees up to her chest with a cup of coffee

During Covid19 there were times when you needed to stay home.  You may have gotten used to doing your own thing.  We are social beings and need to interact with others.  Plan on meeting with someone each day of your vacation.  Plan a social distancing picnic.  Each of you brings your own food and meet at a lovely spot to talk.  If talking is not your strong suit, meet up with a friend and play a game.  It can be a board game, frisbee, throw a ball or try kubb.

A vacation to try new activities 

There nothing better about a vacation than doing something new.  If you can’t travel somewhere new do something new.  Take a week of lessons and learn how to paddleboard, sew, bike, play an instrument, paint etc.  Treat yourself to a new spa treatment every day. Eat at restaurants you’ve never visited before.  Public golf courses have lovely patios that overlook beautiful green spaces.  Try camping.  Start in your own backyard and then explore other campsites.

A vacation to support your country

The country you live in has a lot to offer.  Too often we don’t appreciate what is right in front of us.  Use your vacation to help local businesses and the tourist industry. Whether you want to travel far or close to home, book a hotel or resort and spend your vacation dollars helping to stimulate the economy.  Over many years I have visited all the provinces and 2 of the 3 territories in Canada.  I am proud to tell people of the lovely places I have seen, the great people I have met, the fun experiences and delicious food.

A vacation to support your mental wellness. 

We all need a break from the stress of work and the uncertainty of the future.  Take time to focus on what you need. Plan your vacation to be only in the present.  It may be a stay at home or an away from home location. Enjoy what is around you, interact with people who encourage you, experience things that refresh you.  You may want to try meditation, yoga or exercise.  Take time to try new healthy foods and recipes.  Experience nature.  Plan each day with activities that will renew you so you can handle what comes next.

A vacation to be with family

man and woman holding hands together with boy and girl looking at green trees during day

During Covid19 some of you may be feeling like you need a vacation away from family.  That is ok too. Communication and interactions with family members may have been strained over the last couple of months.  Take a break, laugh together, do new things, go somewhere unexpected.  Together, plan a vacation.  You may decide that each member of the family plans one day and you all do it.  Each member may get to pick one activity they want to do and you combine all the suggestions together.  Take the pressure off the person who usually needs to make all the plans. Use the time to reset relationships, build new respect for each other and have fun.  I have learned when doing family vacations it is really important to plan into each day a time when everyone does their own thing for a while.  Alone time is just as important as together time during a vacation.

Plan a short vacation

Some places still have restrictions on where you can travel.  Plan a number of shorter vacations.  Here are some tips on how to pack light.

The trick to packing for a short trip is to take items that can be used in more than one way.  Take a large bag or backpack with you for items you want handy while you are in transit. You can use that bag for shopping, hiking or at the beach.  Pack a small handbag in your carry-on suitcase to use after you arrive, in the evening and site seeing.  Take one neutral coloured skirt or pants to wear each evening and pack tops that can be worn in the evening and then more casually with shorts the next day. This eliminates separate evening and daytime apparel for a short trip. Sports clothing can take up a lot of space.  For running, hiking biking take clothes that can be hand washed reducing the amount you need to bring.  Although having a wide variety of swimwear may be fun pack 2 outfits that you can mix and match to make 4.  Reduce the number of jackets you take by wearing layers, pack a long-sleeved shirt that you can wear alone or over a t-shirt in case it is cool or you need to cover up from the sun. You will need a sweater/lightweight jacket for the evening and a windbreaker for the day.  Combine the 3 layers to help you stay, cool, warm or dry. Having a colour scheme so all of your clothes go together well gives you lots of outfits to mix and match. While you are in transit wear the shoes that take up the most space and pack the ones that need less space in your carry-on suitcase.  The last thing to do is make a list of what you packed so the next time you go on a short trip the packing is even easier.

Take time for a vacation and let me know what you did to refresh so you will be better able to handle what comes next. 

If you want to talk over your vacation plans,  book a 30 minute complimentary virtual organizing appointment. It allows me to support you by providing planning and coaching while both remaining safely at home. https://mindoverclutter.as.me/virtualorganizingassessment

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She enjoys working with her clients to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She reduces clutter, streamlines processes and manages time to help her clients be more effective in reaching their goals. Julie can coach you to break-free of the physical or emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. 

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:

7 Tips for keeping your vehicle organized

Reading time 5 minutes

We are looking forward to using our vehicles more and travelling again. Vehicles are used as mobile offices, restaurants, entertainment centers, locker rooms and homework stations.  Keeping a vehicle clean can be easy.  Here are 7 tips to help you organize your vehicle.

Garbage Bag

1. Have a plastic garbage bag in the front and back seats of your vehicle.  It can be hooked on the headrest or armrest.  Make sure all garbage is put in the bag and not all over the floor.  When the bag gets full unhook it and put it in your garbage can on the way into the house.  Keep a few extra in the vehicle.

A plastic garbage bag can be hooked on armrests.

A plastic garbage bag can be hooked on armrests.

Place a garbage bag in the back seat by hanging it over the head rest.

Place a garbage bag in the back seat by hanging it over the head rest.

A garbage bag can be anywhere in the car, just make sure it is used.

A garbage bag can be anywhere in the car, just make sure it is used.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a backpack ready

2. If you have a young child keep a backpack ready at the door to take with you in the car.  Fill it with things your child can use to entertain themselves.  When you arrive at home put everything back in the backpack and bring it into the home.  This prevents toys, papers and video games from being left all over the vehicle. It also prevents things from being damaged by being left in a very hot vehicle.

Use your cupholders for temporary storage

3. Cup holders are a great invention.  Put a clean tall cup in the holder and use it to hold pens, pencil crayons, small toys, notes, papers, snacks. It will help to keep items confined to a space and prevent them from being lost in the vehicle.

Organize your change to make it easy to get into your hand or to take out of the car.

Use a cup for your change. it will be easier to retrieve your change . Keep the cup in your cup holder.

Organize your snack in you cup holder

Bring snacks from home and keep them in your cup holder

Organize children's toys in cupholders

Use a cup holder for children’s toys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A portable office 

4. If you use your car for an office try using a bin, box, bag to contain all your supplies.  There are a number of portable office organizers available or make one that is personalized for your situation.

use any container and make a car office organizer

Customize your own portable office for your specific needs

Office organizer for the front seat of the vehicle

This organizer keeps the seat clear for items while organizing your office supplies

Portable office organizer for the car

This office organizer attaches to the seat so it won’t end up on the floor of your vehicle

This is a portable office that can easily be taken with you to the car, meetings, library or hockey arena

This is a portable office that can easily be taken with you to the car, meetings, library or hockey arena

This mobile work station can help to keep your work organized

This mobile work station can help to keep your work organized

 

You spend a lot of time in your vehicle. Keep it a safe and healthy place free from flying objects and germs. Click To TweetClean up messes quickly – people and the vehicle

5 . Keep disposable wet wipes in the glove compartment for quick clean-ups. I have a small container of water, soap and a cloth for washing hands and faces. I keep it in a small box so it won’t roll around the van. I bring it in and change the water and put it back the next time I go to the van.  Keep a roll of paper towels handy.  You never know when they will come in handy for bigger clean-ups.  If you have a mess in the vehicle clean it up right away.  You have the products with you so it is an easy job. Always take everything out of the vehicle when you arrive home.  Use the car door pockets and seatback pockets for items that permanently stay in the car.   If you start with a clean vehicle on every trip it is easier to keep it clean.

 

Prevent messy build up in your car.

Take everything out of the car each time you arrive at home.

Keep disposable wet wipes for quick clean ups of spilled drinks, and dirty hands.

Keep disposable wet wipes for quick clean ups of spilled drinks, and dirty hands.

 

Cleaning up after every trip for a few minutes prevents needing lots of time to clean your vehicle later.

Be ready to jump in your car and go and enjoy your trip, short or long

Keep your cargo area under control

6. It is easy to put things in the back or trunk and arrive home and rush into the home.  If you don’t take the things out then when you add more it becomes fuller and fuller.  There are certain things that live in the cargo space.  Find a home for them.  A box, crate, a built-in storage area, a bag hooked to the side with a 3M hook, under the bottom by the space tire.  Make sure the other items are stored back in their proper place in the garage, basement or home.

Seasonal storage “locker”

7. Sometimes the cargo area is used as a seasonal storage “locker” because there isn’t an easy place to store and access sporting equipment.  Some situations are hockey bags, golf clubs, soccer equipment and water sports.  When the season is over clear out the gear.  Wash it, clean it, dry it and store it away until next year.  Leaving wet equipment in your vehicle year-round will cause it to deteriorate and get mouldy.

I think I covered most problems in your vehicle, garbage, toys, paperwork, messes and cargo areas.  What did I miss?  Let me know in the comments. 

 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports your to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:

Nesting or hoarding? How to offer help.

Reading Tim: 5 minutes

We no longer call it hoarding or call a person a hoarder.  Now we refer to it as hoarding disorder and a person with a hoarding disorder.  There is much more respect for the journey being travelled by the person with a hoarding disorder.

Much is still not completely understood about hoarding disorder.  Is it genetic, is it learned behaviour, is it caused by a mental wellness issue that triggers it?  Is it a combination of all of these?

Making Peace with the Things in Your Life

In Making Peace with the Things in Your by Cindy Glovinsky, she writes about the internal battles of guilt and shame and by making peace with those a person can make peace with their things. She talks about figuring out what is going on in the person’s life so they can figure why they are doing what they are doing. Part I  talks about assumptions, Part II looks at habits and feelings, Part III describes possible causes of dealing with things and solutions and Part IV looks at ways to detach oneself from automatic emotional responses that perpetuate cycles of clutter.

Hoarding disorder is a complex situation involving learning how to change automatic responses that perpetuate clutter cycles. Click To Tweet

Cluttered Pearls The Stigma of Hoarding

This 2013 article takes a close look at the many different types of behaviours involved in hoarding.  The information is still true today. I hope you enjoy  this perspective written by  Jean Oliver  http://www.nexusnewspaper.com/2013/01/24/cluttered-pearls-the-stigma-of-hoarding/

 

Stigma of Hoarding

Hoarding Scale 

The Institute of Challenging Disorganization is a resource for many different types of organizational problems including hoarding disorder. They developed the ICD® Clutter-Hoarding Scale® that is based on five levels of clutter. 

Clutter Image Rating 

The Clutter Image Rating scale (with 9 levels/photos)  was created by Dr. Randy Frost and Dr. Gail Steketee. They are experts in the field of hoarding.  Their books are a good resource.


Offering Help 

A lot of times a friend or family member will offer help. Too often the person thinks it would be better for the friend with hoarding disorder to have a less cluttered space.  The help is usually offered in a well-meaning manner.  If the person with the hoarding disorder is not ready to change, progress will not be made or if some is made it will not be a lasting change. Talk to them about what they want and need.  It may be to join a group for peer support in conquering their hoarding habits, working with a therapist or working with a Professional Organizer.  The journey of changing habits and conquering shame is long but worth the time, energy and support you can give them.

Did I miss anything? Let me know in the comments about your hoarding disorder journey.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports you to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:

Organizing your smaller space to feel like a bigger space

Last week I reviewed a book that helps you to downsize the items in your home.  Once your home is decluttered and organized a few design elements can make your room feel more spacious.  It is important to organize your home so it suits your personality and lifestyle.  As design is is not my strength, I invited a guest blogger, Downtown Apartment Company,  to share a design graphic to help you with making your smaller space feel larger.

There aren’t many of us that live in a place that is as big as we’d like. We have to work with what we got. Luckily, there are ways to make your place feel bigger without adding any square footage. Coping with a smaller living space can be done with a few easy steps.

Using elements of design and psychology, you too can make your small place feel like a big space!

No matter the size, there are a lot of simple yet effective techniques and tricks you can do to really open up your place and make it feel roomier. An example is altering the colours, textures and patterns of your home. Changing the overall design is a fundamental way to affect how people will feel in it.

Using a monochromatic colour palette, for example, will make a room feel more airy and open, compared to a room with loads of contrast. Accenting your room with light fabric curtains and furniture with long, thin legs will also add to the impression that your place is bigger than it really is. Decorating your walls with striped elements will guide the eye horizontally or vertically to creating the feeling of additional height or width, as well.

Accepting your small space doesn’t have to mean feeling like you’re always trapped in a phone booth. Mastering the design elements below will help you and others feel less claustrophobic and more like the place you’ve always dreamed of.

Making Your Small Space Feel Bigger from Downtown Apartment Company

Have I missed anything?  In the comments let me know how you make a space feel larger. 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports you to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Share this:

Scaling down, Living Large in a smaller space

Scaling down

Great ideas for downsizing, moving or moving a family member

This book written by Judi Culbertson and Marj Decker is a complete guide to help you declutter and move. It has practical solutions for downsizing your clothing, collections and dealing with sentimental items.

It also addresses how to move a family member to a supervised living facility. The authors remind you that if your parent can make decisions that your purpose is to help them move happily from a large space to a smaller space not make decisions for them.

It suggests that you write a book about your life, put it down in black and white. A number of different ways of recording events about your life are provided.

It has a chapter on the step-by-step process of moving into your new home. They examine the psychology of making the scaling down change.

It is a great resource to have. Who knows when you will need it.

If you need help preparing for a downsizing move book a virtual organizing appointment with me.  

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home and office. She guides and supports you to manage your time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:
On-line Lifestyle Organizing Coaching leading professionals From Clutter to Freedom
Residential Organizing Services for the Region of Niagara, Hamilton, Halton-Peel and Surrounding Area