5 Organizing myths

People have preconceived ideas about what it means to be organized. Being organized means you can find what you are looking for in a reasonable amount of time.  The myths about being organized are what stop people from moving forward and organizing their lives.  Here is the fallacy in 5 myths.

Myth 1 Organizing is a born talent 

Organization is a skill. You can learn techniques to apply to your situation to get you organized.  If you have the right resources and support it is easy.  Hire a Professional Organizer, read books, watch Youtube and you can learn the steps.  Some tasks at home can be simplified so they are not so overwhelming and time-consuming.  Here is one small example about meal planning.

  1. Pick your menu for the week
  2. From the menu make your shopping list
  3. Now you don’t need to decide what to make each morning or evening and you can take out of the freezer the items you need for later in the day.
  4. After you have done this for a number of weeks or months you can start recycling your plan.  This makes it even easier as you just pull up an already completed menu plan.blue clipboard with a piece of paper titled Meal Plan

Myth 2 – Organized space is neat, tidy, minimal and boring.

Everything needs to have a space, a home, so you know where to put it back.  Some people are visual and will have things displayed other people like things stored behind doors.  Organized spaces should reflect your personality and lifestyle. If you can’t enjoy the space then you won’t take care of it.

Myth 3 – Getting organized is an overwhelming, hopeless chore 

No matter what you’re organizing, no matter how daunting the task or how huge the backlog, getting organized boils down to developing a predictable process that you can reproduce. You follow your process and organize the current things you are using and then each time you’re organizing, work for a little time on the backlog.  Divide the job into smaller tasks, organize one cupboard, one drawer, one table or one closet.  Eventually, the entire room will be organized one small step at a time.

A man sitting at a desk with paperwork spread all around.

Develop processes that work for you, so you can stay organized.

Myth 4 – It’s impossible to stay organized

Organizing is sustainable if your system is built around the way you think and designed to grow and adapt with you.  Here are some tips:

  1. If it only takes 30 seconds, do it right away if not add it to your to-do list
  2. Most unorganized people don’t notice things are in the “wrong place.” Look and do a mental check to see if everything has been returned to its assigned space.
  3. Use spare minutes wisely.  Have a list of small tasks that can be completed quickly when you are waiting for meetings, appointments, trains, planes, children, elderly parents.
  4. Use your lists to record: things to do, to call, to e-mail and errands.  Check the list don’t just write it down.

Myth 5 Organizing is a non-productive use of your time

You can’t afford to not be organized. A national survey conducted by Professional Organizers in Canada indicates 91% of disorganized Canadians feel that disorganization negatively impacts their lives – with a large focus on feelings of stress, frustration and even failure. According to a study by a Boston marketing firm, the average American loses 55 minutes a day, roughly 12 weeks a year, looking for things they know they own but can’t find.

Did I miss any organizing myths? Share your favourite myth in the comments. 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Share this:

4 easy ways to organize your meal planning – Is it possible?

Meal planning can seem like a difficult chore.  I am going to talk about 4 ways to simplify your menu planning. Organizing your menu will give you a healthier diet, save money on food and create a relaxed mealtime.   

Shuffle the Deck

Make menu planning into a game. Compile recipes for 20 to 30 easy-to-prepare main dishes and the same number of side dishes and desserts. Cut them out of magazines, download them the internet.  Get together with friends and each bring 10 recipes and share them.

1.  Put each recipe on a 5 x 8 card, noting any special ingredients that require a stop at a specialty shop.

2.  File all the recipe cards in a card box.

Each week:

1. Select your required number of main dishes.

Pasta and Broccoli

Mix and Match side dishes to give each meal a new appearance

2. Mix and match them with side dishes and desserts.

Pita Sandwich

Meal Planning can be easy if you make it into a game

Your menu is complete.

 

 

 

 

 

Plan a month of meals

I like to plan a month of meals and then take the plan and repeat it for 6 months.  I find there are different meals made in the winter than in the summer.  Make one menu plan for the colder months and one menu plan for the warmer months.  Each year review it, add a few new items.  The easiest way to do this is to write down everything you make for one month.  Now you have a plan.  You might want to look through books, or websites and collect ideas. I used to do my planning while I was waiting for one of my children to finish a sports practice.   With this system, you will only eat each item 6 times.  If you didn’t plan the menu I think there would be some meals you would eat a lot more times than just 6.

Plan using a grid 

I like to make a grid with categories across the top.  The categories might be based on food, ways of cooking or time limits.  It may be a combination of these categories.  When my kids were at home, I needed some meals to be ready quickly because they came home and left for work or a sport.  Other days I would arrive home from work later so I prepared supper in a crockpot.

Under each category (column), you fill in meal ideas, record where to find the recipe and if there are any unusual ingredients that need to be put on the grocery list.

Each week you read across (row) and you have your menu and your grocery list. This provides lots of variety in the menu and it is adaptable to your needs each week.

As my children got older one of the categories became new food. After the new meal, we would evaluate it and see if it stayed on the grid or was voted off. If it stayed on the grid, it would be move to the appropriate category, after all, it isn’t a new meal anymore.

Adapt the categories to suit your family and culture.  This grid has 7 rows so it is a menu plan for 2 months.  Repeat it 6 times and you have a year of meals planned.Save money on food, save time on deciding what's for supper and have less stressful mealtimes by planning once and using your plans over and over. Click To Tweet

Apps

The other ideas lent themselves to paper.  I like paper because you can post it in the kitchen and everyone knows what is for supper and can help.  Apps are wonderful. You can select your menu and the app will generate the shopping list.  Big Oven is one of many apps.

Breakfast and Lunch

You can plan your breakfast and lunch menus in the same way.  I find those meals to be more repetitious and easy to just have groceries on hand and let people decide what they feel like.  I always make more supper servings than are needed at the meal (2-4 more) so they are available for lunches and late night snacks for the hard-working athletes in the home.  Sometimes I would remove those extra servings before the group sat down to supper.

However you like to plan, paper or digital or a combination use your plans over and over.  Do the planning once a month, twice a year or yearly.  Take the stress out of “what’s for supper” and you will end up spending less money eating out, less money wasting food and less time worrying.

Coupon Tip

If you like clipping coupons, write your shopping list on the back of an envelope, and stuff the envelope with the appropriate coupons.

Leaving the decision about what to eat for the last minute makes every meal stressful. Do you like menu planning? If you want help book a virtual menu planning meeting with me.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Share this:

These are the steps, decluttering then organizing

Just because something brought you joy in the past doesn’t mean you should carry it forever. The possessions you keep should represent the person you are trying to become, not the person you were.  Keep this in mind when you start your decluttering journey. As you start to let go of things it will become easier and easier.  Here are steps to help you on your path to finding your treasures.

 Planning the space 

1. Decide what the goal is for the room.  Is it to have a:

  • Beautiful compact space
  • Functional workshop
  • Sense of freedom and control
  • the Joy of financially exchanging stuff for new experiences and pleasures.
  • Clear out a parent’s home
  • Make things easier for the next generation
  • Streamline your lifestyle

2. Decide what you want the room to look like and be used for. Draw a floor plan and make a list of activities that happen in that space.  It will help you to know what to keep.

3. Decision criteria

Set up some questions to help you with your decision making.  Here are some examples:

  • How many of these do I have? How many is enough?
  • Does the item fit in with my values?
  • Is this item current?
  • Is this item really valuable?
  • Will owning this help to resolve my clutter?
  • What is the worst thing that can happen if I don’t have it?
  • Can I borrow it from somewhere?
  • Does it bring me joy?
  • Do you need it?

4. How much is enough?

Look around the room and decide what percentage of stuff you need to give away so everything will fit into the room.  25% 50% 75%?

5. If you don’t schedule it, it won’t get done.

Schedule time do it when you are not rushed.   Do one area, room, box or even corner of a room depending on how much stuff you have to go through and your deadline.

6. Prepare the room for working.

You will need a series of boxes, bins , bags or containers. for garbage, recycling, donations, items to go to other rooms, items to return to people.

5 Methods  for decluttering the room 

I’m going to go through a number of ways to sort through your items and you can decide what method works best for you.  At first, decluttering is easy because you find items that you know you don’t want and just haven’t given them away yet.  Then it becomes more challenging. You must chip away at identifying which items are true treasures versus those you feel guilty about giving away.  Remember to reduce by the percentage you choose in your planning.

1. Have a box 

The simplest way to start is to keep a box in your closet and whenever you find something you don’t need put it into the box and you can start decluttering right away.

2.Skimming

  • Go to a closet/cupboard and select the best items in each that category.
  • Most cupboards/closets will have more than one category.
  • For example, in a kitchen, the cupboard might have baking dishes, casserole dishes, muffins tins, loaf pans.  Pick the best 1 or 2 of each of these 4 categories and donate the rest.
  • Continue to open each cupboard and drawer skimming the contents and selecting 1 or 2 items from each category.

3. Sort then declutter

  • Go clockwise around the room sorting items into groups by function
  • Do the surfaces first and then the drawers and cupboards next
  • When you are done, the garbage and recycling will be collected and removed from the room
  • All the items in the room will be in groups
  • Each room will have different categories/groups of items. Here are some examples, books, electronics, tools, dishes, home decor, games, clothing, photos  etc

Look at one category/group and apply the questions and percentage you determined in the planning stage.  Start removing items.

If that method doesn’t work for you and you are keeping everything, try a different method.

4.Grouping

Keep the Best of the Best. Instead of thinking about giving things away, it might be easier to think about keeping the best.

  • After you have sorted the room make sure you are keeping the best one.  You need to see all of the items in one group together and keep only as many as you need or the percentage you set in the planning stage, keep the best ones.

5.Triage

  • Gather all your items from one category
  • Pick up the first three and remove the one you like the least.
  • Pick up 3 more and remove one again
  • After you have gone through the category/group you will have decluttered  by 1/3

If you are sentimental

  • Try taking a picture of the items so you have the memory and let go of the item go.
  • Find a good home for the thing you are letting go of,  they are still useful just not to you anymore.
  • “Shrink it”, only keep one item from a collection instead of the entire collection, you will still have the memory
  • Ask yourself, what would be best, having a number of boxes with large quantities of unsorted keepsakes or a carefully assembled box of very precious treasures?

Decluttering is about having a mindset of letting go and having less. Once you experience the joy of being unburdened from cleaning, organizing, buying, repairing stuff you don’t need, want, use or like you’ll wonder why you didn’t start sooner.   Enjoy the journey. Set your goals, develop your decision criteria and then begin decluttering your space. Click To Tweet

Did I miss anything?

If you need help to start your decluttering project work with me virtually on zoom. 

 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Share this:

3 Ways to organize your goals for this year.

January is usually the time for goal setting.  Why am I writing about it in February? You may have thought about setting goals, you procrastinated so it never got done. January was a busy month this year with all the ongoing changes related to Covid 19.  Now might be a better time for you to take a moment and think about goals.  Goals don’t have to be set in January you can do it any time of the year.  I want to present three ways of setting goals.

Pick one  area and improve it

I am a person who is motivated by a fear of failure, I don’t want to fail, so I am cautious. My system of setting goals is to look at my business or life and see where I think could be improved, what types of skills I need to improve so my business or life will improve.  I pick one thing and then work on it all year to get better at it.  For example, I didn’t like social media so I decided to start working at becoming better at it and setting up a system that works for my day and philosophy about the importance of social media.  I picked a platform, got good at it and continued to add more and more platforms. I organized workshops on Twitter and Google My Business, I listened to webinars.   A vague plan works for me because  I am self-motivated,  I am not a procrastinator.  I read an interesting article by Ravi Venkatesan about the importance of learning new things, “What skill will you acquire this year? What new activity will you start?” Perhaps learning to play a new instrument, going on an adventure or taking on a new role- anything that causes you to move out of your comfort zone.  Pick a goal that challenges you at about a level 5 out of 10.  If you are too fearful you will panic and not start.   Choose that goal that challenges you and allows new neural connections to form. That would be a good goal for this year.

S.M.A.R.T Goals

Set goals that you can attain

That vague framework of deciding what you want to do to improve your business or life would not for everyone.  We are all different.  So there is a goal-setting system called SMART.  You pick a specific goal, with measurable outcomes, that are achievable, realistic and timely.  When you use this system of goal setting it gives you a step by step plan to follow.  For example with my social media goal, if it had been a SMART goal, would be something like

I will learn how to post on Facebook,

S (specific) – I will post 3 times a week, one original content, one a picture, one comment on someone else’s post

M(measurable) – Did I post 3 times/week?

A (achievable)  – I have that much time in my week

R(realistic) – If I only have to do it 3 times a week I will not become frustrated and stop

T(timely)- I have 3 mornings a week when I can do these posts. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday

This will work for some people who like to have a step by step plan and follow it.  It can cause problems if people stop following the plan. They may give up and not start again or some people may feel like it is too rigid.  Set your goal and keep trying to do it, that is the only way you will get better at it.

Turn desire into intention

Be intentional about your plan

I read an article that reveals a simple trick that doubles the chance for success of obtaining goals.  Earlier I commented on what motivates me.  Sometimes we say, I need to motivate myself to get working on….,  In this article, it says motivation is not the key to reaching your goals it is intention.

A study in the British Journal of Health Psychology divided 248 adults into 3 exercise groups.

  • Group  1 had to record how often they exercised during a 3 week period
  • Group 2 were told “ most young adults who have stuck to a regular exercise program have found it to be very effective in reducing their chances of developing coronary heart disease. ” ( motivation to exercise) and had to record how often they exercised during a 3 week period
  • Group 3  recorded when and where they would exercise (intention to exercise), they were given the same motivation as group 2  and they recorded  how often they exercised during a 3 week period

Results

  • Control group 1 38% exercised at least once per week
  • The motivated group 2 35% exercised at least once per week
  • The intentional group 3 91% exercised at least once per week

We all have some level of desire or willpower or motivation but what turns desire into action is a written plan for implementation.  When you have a goal to do something, record when and how you will do that behaviour or activity. It will be the environment that triggers you to do your new behaviour or activity and not motivation or will power.  This year I used the intention method to become better at making videos.

  • Every morning for 30 days I made a video of 1 minute or less and sent it to a friend.  It was not edited and most of the time there was only one take, no practice videos.  The when of the intention, was at 8 am and the who of the intention, was a friend who expected to receive a video.
  • Step 2 was 30 days of videos on Instagram Stories.  It was usually at 8:15 am but sometimes it was at another time in the day when I was getting dressed up for a meeting.  Check out my Instagram stories.
  • Step 3 ( I am not there yet) will be 30 days on Facebook live.

The level of challenge increases with each step.  It is a great way to become better at doing video.  Thanks to James Mel for teaching me this.

These are just 3 systems

  • Having an all-encompassing vision or
  • Setting SMART goals or
  • Intentionally decide when you will do something and block off time

that can help you establish new behaviours to accomplish a goal for 2021.  Pick the one that works for you.

Set goals to help you move out of your comfort zone, learn new skills and grow. Click To Tweet

When you hire me, I don’t come to your office or home with the Mind over Clutter organizing system, install it and then leave.  I come and see what is working for you and how you do things so I can find solutions that work for you, how you think, feel and your lifestyle. I want you to accomplish your organizing project so you meet your goals.

Now I liked to hear from you:

What strategy from today’s post are you going to try first?

Maybe I didn’t mention your favourite way to set goals?

Either way, let me know by leaving a comment below right now.

Want help in 2021 to get your Mind and Space Organized, join my Facebook group full of free tips 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebookFacebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:

5 reasons to use checklists for organizing your mind and space

I  believe that having routines helps you to accomplish things using less energy.  It automates chores and tasks that need to be done regularly to keep an office or home organized.  If one person has routines for the tasks the system works.  That person will get burnt out doing all the work.  Delegating the work is the key.  How do you delegate work that is in someone’s mind?

Checklists

Checklists can be used for many reasons.

  • to make a process repeatable
  • to clarify a task for another person
  • to schedule tasks to be completed at regular intervals
  • to reduce what you need to remember

Reproducible

I have many tasks that I do infrequently or I am learning.  I set up a checklist with all steps I need to do so I don’t forget one.  The checklist takes the stress out of completing the task.  I don’t need to figure out how to do it each time.  The checklist will become refined after each use when I realize I left out a step or I have found an easier way to do it.

Some examples are:

Collecting income tax records:

  • material needs to be gathered from a number of institutions,
  • forms need to be filed,
  • receipts need to be organized,
  • copies made,

Setting up meetings:

  • agendas prepared
  • reports requested to be compiled/ submitted ahead of time for the meeting
  • meeting notice sent with the current date, time,  location and attachments
  • set-up meeting room in-person or virtual
  •  take meeting minutes
  • meeting minutes sent out to attendees
  • follow up on items to be completed by participants

Social media posting

  • list hyperlinks to social media sites so I don’t need to look them up each time
  • record steps on how to post to each site until it becomes easy
  • record date when something was posted
  • record the topic that was posted so it is not posted twice

Photo by STIL on Unsplash

Clarity

How many times have you asked someone to do something and you come back and you are shocked by what they did or didn’t do?   Checklists clarify what needs to be done in order to call the task completed. It allows you to delegate work.

Some examples are:

Clean your room – this means something different to each person

  • Take the sheets and pillowcases off the bed and put them in the laundry
  • Put on clean sheets and pillowcases
  • Pick up everything off the floor and put it away
  • Dust everything( list the items)
  • Vacuum the floor, closet and under the bed
  • Empty the garbage can into ……

Filing

  • place documents in designated box for filing
  • recycle advertising
  • shred unimportant documents with personal information on them
  • sort pile alphabetically or by date or category
  • file placing new documents in the front, header to the left

Planning an event for your family or at work

  • set date, time and place
  • send out notice/invitation with date, time, directions, need to know information, RSVP
  • start to build a purchasing list
  • decide on food and drink- quantities, order or prepare on site
  • set up the room – seating, decorations,  pens, paper
  • clean the location
  • have a place for coats
  • plan activity- ice breakers, games,
  • purchase/shop for items for the event
  • set up a timetable for the event
  • reminder notice
  • post signs showing where to go, the name of the event Developing a checklist is a good way to think through all the steps in a task. Click To Tweet

Avoid mistakes, frustration and embarrassment 

Checklists are great for things you do from memory to confirm you have not missed anything.  Memory is fallible, especially the busier you get.  If you have a checklist you won’t forget to make sure you have enough handouts for your meeting, you have defrosted the meat for supper, you have your passport etc. Sometimes I have a mental checklist I run through before leaving the house, a written checklist is better

How to write a good checklist 

In his book, Gawande said a good checklist contains only five to nine items and fits on one page. You might not get your checklist right the first time, so practice using it in the real world, and then refine as needed.

Checklists can improve performance, help you be more consistent, reduce anxiety and errors.  If there is something you are doing and it is hard, complicated, never seems to go right or needs to be delegated try making a checklist for that task.  It is a good way to think through all the steps in a task. It only works if you use it before you begin your task.

Need help making a checklist book a 30-minute complimentary virtual organizing appointment. https://mindoverclutter.as.me/virtualorganizingassessment

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Share this:

How a messy person can learn to be neat

Welcome to 2021.  I hope you have challenges you conquer, joys you share and fun to revitalize yourself.

I am a naturally organized person.  It comes very easily to me. Many people find getting and staying organized difficult.  You will enjoy reading my guest blogger’s article on how to become neat by Sophia Perry of Arizona Moving Professionals.

Trust me when I tell you that a messy person can learn to be neat. As a former slob who daily transferred a ginormous pile of semi-dirty clothes from bed (when it’s sleep time) to the work desk, and vice versa, I can tell you, you too can transform. I don’t even know how it used to get to the point of having almost the entire content of my wardrobe on the bed. But it did.

And the story doesn’t end there. The most frustrating thing was the laundry. I wash one round. While it dries, the second is being washed. I still haven’t folded the first one, and the second is drying. Soon there is the third round. And the rest of my wardrobe is now clean but wrinkled beyond recognition, on an armchair waiting for something to happen. And when I finally get round to dealing with those mountains of clothes, I end up with a closet so messy that I don’t even know what clothes I have. I wish I could say these were my greatest issues, but… There were also dishes. Technically, the situation was the same as with the laundry. It’s just that I never managed to empty the dishwasher, so new dirty dishes piled up in the sink, and… Well, you get the picture. However, there is help! Much like the 12-step program, here too, there are steps to take to get on the path of tidiness.

1. Designate a place for each and every item you possess.

After a long day at work, believe me, I understand the tiredness. But don’t drop your pants, key, and shoes wherever you see fit and leave them lying there until you need them again. If you know that shoes belong in the hallway, keys on a peg next to the door, and jeans in the closet, go put them there. Repeat every day. It will start feeling normal. It will become an automatic thing.

2. Eyes on the prize – visualize the outcome and work on the road to get there.

To stay motivated, it’s vital to be realistic. Start small. Set a few attainable goals every day, and cross them off the list once you’ve done them. The crossing off will create a feeling of accomplishment and get you incentivized to keep going. It’s like training yourself. In addition to daily plans, start making weekly and monthly plans as well. Put them up on your fridge, so you remind yourself of what needs doing. It will bring some organization to your life.

Motivation can come unexpectedly. For example, once I heard a motivational speaker, whose name I can’t recollect, say: “If your bed is a mess, your life is a mess.” He explained that it’s his morning routine that makes him successful. He gets up, works out, and makes his bed. Making the bed is a task he completed early in the morning. So he set himself for success. He already accomplished something. Needless to say, I have made a habit of making my bed every morning now.

Set small goals every day and cross them off the list. It will make you feel like you have accomplished something.

3. Stop with the hoarding.

Stop piling up clutter. Having too many things is what complicates the cleaning process. And not just that, to many items to wipe, move, dust are downright overwhelming. As Marie Kondo says, and I’m paraphrasing – if it doesn’t make you happy, get rid of it. Also, if you haven’t used it for a long time – get rid of it. If you don’t need it – you’ve guessed it, it goes out. Finally, don’t accumulate sentimental knickknacks. Don’t get attached to things. They are just things. Many have fallen into this trap. If you don’t enjoy, need, or use something, lose it. A messy person can learn to be neat if they learn to declutter mercilessly! I have come to despise ornaments with no purpose, just because they add to the cleaning time. And time is precious.

Moreover, clutter can get in the way of productivity. Therefore, tidying up your workspace is very important. This is especially crucial if you work from home. There are already too many distractors. And several dirty coffee mugs, a mountain of clothes on your chair, dirty socks on the floor are not helpful. Also, too many things on your desk, such as purposeless ornaments, don’t make for a suitable working environment.

Clutter can get in the way of productivity. Keep your workspace tidy and organized.

4. Simplify cleaning.

How can cleaning be simplified, you wonder? Well, simple. Organize your home so that it’s easier to tidy. Decluttering is one way to do it. But you can do more. For instance, I’ve realized that curtains really make my life difficult. So I got rid of them and replaced them with zebra blinds. They are stylish, modern, and, most importantly, easy to maintain. There is no washing, ironing, hanging. Just occasional wipe with a wet cloth and a bit of dusting. Good quality ones are antistatic, so even dusting is optional. Think of the areas in your home that cause you the most headaches, and figure out ways to make them more manageable.

5. It all boils down to making new habits.

Make yourself do something, even the smallest thing, every day. Not every week or every few days, but every single day. The point is to make it a habit to keep your home neat and tidy. If tidiness doesn’t come instinctively, you must train yourself. Basically, repeat until it’s a routine. Every time you leave a room, try to leave it better than you found it. Put a thing or two away. As you cook, put dirty dishes in the dishwasher as soon as you are done with them. Wipe the surface the second you spill something. Don’t let things get really filthy. So big cleaning will be less frequent.

If tidying up doesn’t come instinctively to you, make a habit of it.

A messy person can learn to be neat

Some people call it a creative mess. Some say they can only function in chaos. They claim they can’t find anything if their home is tidy. But is it really true? Or are those excuses? Old habits are hard to break, but a messy person can learn to be neat. It’s essential to change self-image. You are not a slob or a lazy person – you need to purge. Rid yourself of clutter and bad habits. Finally, make positive associations with cleaning. Listen to music or an audiobook. That way, an unpleasant, mundane task will become something more enjoyable.

Let me help you to leave your messy self behind. Book a 30-minute complimentary virtual organizing assessment.  https://mindoverclutter.as.me/virtualorganizingassessment

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:

5 Bathroom Organizing Tips

1. Have a drawer for each person who uses the bathroom to store his or her toiletries and cosmetics.  If you don’t have the space to store items in the bathroom, give each person a basket to transport their things to the bathroom from his or her bedroom, where the basket is stored.

2. Purchase under-sink storage shelves or baskets to make good use of this under-utilized area.

Creatively use the space under the sink

Find a shelf or stacking baskets to use under the sink

3.  If medications are stored in the bathroom, safely store them where small children can’t gain access.

4.  Store cleaning supplies safely, out of the reach of children, nearby so you can do quick cleans ups.

5.  Add hooks or towel bars to the walls or over-the-door racks/hooks to hang and dry towels after use.  Not enough room in the bathroom?  Install hooks or bars in the bedrooms.  This will keep towels off the floor, neat and clean.

Swing out towels bars provide space between each towel so they can dry quickly

Swing out towels bars provide space between each towel so they can dry quickly

Here is a link to a lovely informatic from Modern Bathroom to help you have a visual of organizing a bathroom.

If you need help organizing your bathroom book a 30 minute complimentary virtual assessment. 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:

Season’s Greetings

The longest day of darkness December 21

A happy woman on a beach.

We have passed the longest day of darkness in 2020 and move into more light coming into our lives each day.

I hope your holiday season is filled with :

  • joy for all the things you have learned and conquered in 2020
  • light to see a new way of building relationships and
  • happy expectations for 2021.

Wishing you a season where you can feel joy, light and happiness.

Share how you overcome the darkness to fill it with light.

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

 

Share this:

Clutter free Christmas gift of organizing

Looking for a Gift of Time to give this Holiday Season?

Mind over Clutter.ca has 3-hour packages designed to help with any number of tasks in the home and office.  Consider purchasing an:

  • Income tax receipt organizing package
  • Holiday cleanup package
  • Streamlining your office package
  • Organizing for the New Year

New this year a virtual organizing package consisting of:

  • An initial meeting to discuss the project and make a schedule
  • Followed by 3 guided work sessions to coach and mentor you through the work

Value 

Packages can be designed to fit the individual needs of the recipient.  This gift helps remove stress and clutter without creating more clutter.  Working with a professional will help them to meet their goals successfully. Purchase your introductory package in 2020 for $150.00.  Contact julie@mindoverclutter.ca to purchase your clutter-free gift of time.

What is the best holiday gift you received this year? 

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

 

Share this:

5 Tips for organizing for a H.A.P.P.Y. holiday

Here are some tips for holiday planning to make a H A P P Y month.

Holiday Decorating

You may be feeling overwhelmed or disorganized by the number of items on display in your house.  Try putting the non-seasonal items away to reduce the number of items on display.

Keep decorations simple

Decorate with flowers

Think about decorating with fewer items but larger size items.  This means there are fewer items to pack and unpack which will reduce the amount of time you need to prepare your home.

Take advantage of using linens to cover tables or end tables and pillows to decorate couches.  They may be less bulky to store and cover a larger area making your home seem completely decorated while taking less time to get the job done.

Use items that self destruct so you don’t need to pack them away, flowers, paper towels, tissue boxes all give your house a festival spirit but don’t need to be packed away and stored.

When you go through your decorations part with the ones you know longer need early in the month so thrift store have an opportunity to sell them and so they don’t need to store them until next year.  Some stores don’t take holiday décor in January and then you will be stuck storing them for another year.

What tips do you have for a H.A.P.P.Y holiday season? Click To Tweet

 Accept Help

Acknowledge that you are feeling overwhelmed and stressed and when people offer to do things say yes.  We all love to help people so let people feel good about themselves by allowing them to help you.

Parties may be much smaller this year. It is a good time to try a new way of doing things.  Allow people to help clean up dishes on their way out the door.  In fact be ready for it.  Have a place to put cutlery to soak.  Have out a container for compost.  Put glasses or coffee mugs directly into the dishwasher.

You may need to accept help with setting up an online party.  Put one of those “youngsters” in charge.

Planning is important

Use a to do list. Divide your to do list into to pick up, to e-mail, to call, to buy then you can plan your day and route to get things done and not be driving back and forth all over town.  The trick here is to actually look at the list and use it not just make it.

Keep your plans from year to year, record your menu, grocery list quantities, timelines.  Each year you can reuse, revise and update the plan.  This year’s plan may need a lot of updating.  Look at it as a way to try new things.

 People and relationships are the reason for the season

Some people like to send cards in December.  I keep my cards and addresses and stamps altogether.  When I am going somewhere where I will be waiting I pick up the supplies and take them along and write my cards.  I have done it in many places including my van. .  I usually leave replies to someone who has sent me a longer letter until January.

Use your spare moments to write cards

If you want to automate the card-sending operation there is a company called Send Out Cards.

Gift-giving may be an area where you are developing a system. Have you thought about Clutter-free gift giving?

Consider the idea of a gift that self destructs.  See my post on Clutter Free Gift Giving last week.

Yes you can 

Being organized is more about an attitude than how something looks.  It is not about having the perfect home, party or gift. It is doing the best you can with the time and resources that you have. The only way to get better at organizing is to practice. It is a skill that can be learned and with practice it becomes easier and easier.  This year’s challenge maybe technology.  Ask for help and practice ahead of time.  You might want to play Yahtzee at your gathering.  Try using these 2 sites.

Score sheet http://www.playonlinedicegames.com/scoresheet/yahtzee

Dice roller https://www.elversonpuzzle.com/yahtzee-dice-roller.html

 

POC Gold Leaf Member

Julie Stobbe is a Trained Professional Organizer and Lifestyle Organizing Coach who brings happiness to homes and organization to offices, in person and virtually. She has been working with clients since 2006 to provide customized organizing solutions to suit their individual needs and situation. She uses her love of physical activity to reduce clutter, in your home, office, mind and time. If you’re in a difficult transition Julie can coach you to break-free of emotional clutter constraining you from living life on your terms. Get started by downloading Tips for Reorganizing 9 Rooms.

Contact her at julie@mindoverclutter.ca

 TwitterFacebook Facebook group Organizing Mind and Space

Click here to learn more about working with a Professional Organizer?

Share this:
On-line Lifestyle Organizing Coaching leading professionals From Clutter to Freedom
Residential Organizing Services for the Region of Niagara, Hamilton, Halton-Peel and Surrounding Area